Top 7 Tips for Improving Your GPA

Elevate - The Honor Society Magazine
Top 7 Tips for Improving Your GPA
Oct 24,2018

How to Improve Your GPA

We'll cover tips that are universally helpful among high school and college students. It doesn't matter what grade you're in; what matters is how well you can apply yourself and stick to it. Let's cover the top 7 tips to boost your GPA.

1. Use a Note Taking Method

Taking notes alone helps you retain information. That's true even if you don't read them after writing them. Writing down the information is another way of cataloging and running over the material in your brain.

The more you review and engage with information, the more likely you are to retain it. That being said, you should go over your notes after writing them. But half the time, notes are scribbled and incoherent, making them nearly useless as they pertain to studying for a test.

Look around online and find a note-taking strategy to use. Find one that works for you and stick to it. What matters is that you categorize information and organize it in a way that helps you review.

2. Be Present

The most detrimental thing you can do for your grade is miss class. We all know the students who rarely show up to class and still get straight A's somehow. Don't worry about those people: they won't be able to ride that wave forever.

Even if it sounds really nice to skip class and go get a burrito, you'll be paying for that burrito with points from your GPA. Go to class and be alert while you're there. You're already in the room, so why not be present and engaged with your teacher?

3. Ask for Help

Public speaking freaks people out. That's understandable, but think about the people in the class who ask questions; you normally really like them.

People who ask questions are usually the ones who ask the same questions that you have, and they make the teacher happy as they break awkward silences when the class is supposed to have an answer. When we're worried about speaking, we're worried about how we're going to look.

You aren't going to look stupid if you have a question. Even if you haven't said a peep all year in the class-- ask a question. You'll get the answers you need straight from the source and you won't have to stop in after class if you don't want to.

4. Visit Your Teacher or Professor

You'd be hard-pressed to find an instructor who didn't like having conversations with students. Fine, you probably know a crotchety old Scrooge or two, but you'll find that most teachers want to help.

They like to know that you're trying, and they certainly want to get to know you. Having a conversation with your instructor face-to-face will help you learn far more than you would if you were sitting in class.

Come in with a question or two and branch off into a conversation once you have the answer. Ask your instructor about where they went to college, what their interests are, and how they think you should go about improving your grade.

5. Find a Quiet Place

Studying is the same thing as a job. Don't let anyone tell you different. You have work to do and you'll face consequences if you don't do it-- that's a job.

With that in mind, what makes you think that studying around a group of your friends who are talking is a good idea? That's just called hanging out with your friends.

Find a quiet room in your home, or a chair in the library, and make it a point to go there for a set amount of time each day. You'll do a lot better with some silence paired with consistency.

6. Make Sacrifices

While it can be hard to give up things that you like for the act of studying, you need to put things into perspective. A good GPA can get you into a good school or help you get a good job. Better yet, working hard in school can make it so you have to work a lot less hard later in life.

Whatever you're doing instead of studying, it can probably wait. Even sports need to take the back seat to study. Video games, parties, whatever.

Do what you have to do so that you can do what you want to do later. It's as simple as that, and it's what's necessary if you want to improve your GPA. Make a list of things that are distracting to you and try to pick a dedicated time to do those things.

That way, you'll know that study time is study time. Not Fortnite time.

7. Find Your Motivation

Ultimately, all of the things listed above are just tricks to get yourself to work harder and more efficiently. The real trick is finding a way to intrinsically motivate yourself.

You're the one who suffers or benefits from how well you do in school. Think about what you want out of life, how you want to feel about yourself, and how important your future is to you.

Try and think about how much your family has sacrificed to get you to where you are, what your grandmother would think if she knew you were killing zombies instead of studying while she had to work two jobs when she went to school. Whatever your story is, try and find your place in it.

If you want to do well in school, you're gonna have to dig deep sometimes!

Need More Help?

Boosting your GPA is hard enough on its own. When you pair school with work, family, and relationships, it can all get pretty overwhelming.

Sometimes you need a community to look to. If you're interested in learning more about how to better your opportunities for the future through a dedicated community, contact us to learn more.

About the Author
Follow us for the latest at HonorSociety.org


Top 7 Tips for Improving Your GPA

 Top 7 Tips for Improving Your GPA

Top 7 Tips for Improving Your GPA

Top 7 Tips for Improving Your GPA

How to Improve Your GPA

We'll cover tips that are universally helpful among high school and college students. It doesn't matter what grade you're in; what matters is how well you can apply yourself and stick to it. Let's cover the top 7 tips to boost your GPA.

1. Use a Note Taking Method

Taking notes alone helps you retain information. That's true even if you don't read them after writing them. Writing down the information is another way of cataloging and running over the material in your brain.

The more you review and engage with information, the more likely you are to retain it. That being said, you should go over your notes after writing them. But half the time, notes are scribbled and incoherent, making them nearly useless as they pertain to studying for a test.

Look around online and find a note-taking strategy to use. Find one that works for you and stick to it. What matters is that you categorize information and organize it in a way that helps you review.

2. Be Present

The most detrimental thing you can do for your grade is miss class. We all know the students who rarely show up to class and still get straight A's somehow. Don't worry about those people: they won't be able to ride that wave forever.

Even if it sounds really nice to skip class and go get a burrito, you'll be paying for that burrito with points from your GPA. Go to class and be alert while you're there. You're already in the room, so why not be present and engaged with your teacher?

3. Ask for Help

Public speaking freaks people out. That's understandable, but think about the people in the class who ask questions; you normally really like them.

People who ask questions are usually the ones who ask the same questions that you have, and they make the teacher happy as they break awkward silences when the class is supposed to have an answer. When we're worried about speaking, we're worried about how we're going to look.

You aren't going to look stupid if you have a question. Even if you haven't said a peep all year in the class-- ask a question. You'll get the answers you need straight from the source and you won't have to stop in after class if you don't want to.

4. Visit Your Teacher or Professor

You'd be hard-pressed to find an instructor who didn't like having conversations with students. Fine, you probably know a crotchety old Scrooge or two, but you'll find that most teachers want to help.

They like to know that you're trying, and they certainly want to get to know you. Having a conversation with your instructor face-to-face will help you learn far more than you would if you were sitting in class.

Come in with a question or two and branch off into a conversation once you have the answer. Ask your instructor about where they went to college, what their interests are, and how they think you should go about improving your grade.

5. Find a Quiet Place

Studying is the same thing as a job. Don't let anyone tell you different. You have work to do and you'll face consequences if you don't do it-- that's a job.

With that in mind, what makes you think that studying around a group of your friends who are talking is a good idea? That's just called hanging out with your friends.

Find a quiet room in your home, or a chair in the library, and make it a point to go there for a set amount of time each day. You'll do a lot better with some silence paired with consistency.

6. Make Sacrifices

While it can be hard to give up things that you like for the act of studying, you need to put things into perspective. A good GPA can get you into a good school or help you get a good job. Better yet, working hard in school can make it so you have to work a lot less hard later in life.

Whatever you're doing instead of studying, it can probably wait. Even sports need to take the back seat to study. Video games, parties, whatever.

Do what you have to do so that you can do what you want to do later. It's as simple as that, and it's what's necessary if you want to improve your GPA. Make a list of things that are distracting to you and try to pick a dedicated time to do those things.

That way, you'll know that study time is study time. Not Fortnite time.

7. Find Your Motivation

Ultimately, all of the things listed above are just tricks to get yourself to work harder and more efficiently. The real trick is finding a way to intrinsically motivate yourself.

You're the one who suffers or benefits from how well you do in school. Think about what you want out of life, how you want to feel about yourself, and how important your future is to you.

Try and think about how much your family has sacrificed to get you to where you are, what your grandmother would think if she knew you were killing zombies instead of studying while she had to work two jobs when she went to school. Whatever your story is, try and find your place in it.

If you want to do well in school, you're gonna have to dig deep sometimes!

Need More Help?

Boosting your GPA is hard enough on its own. When you pair school with work, family, and relationships, it can all get pretty overwhelming.

Sometimes you need a community to look to. If you're interested in learning more about how to better your opportunities for the future through a dedicated community, contact us to learn more.